• NQBP has a long and respected history of successfully delivering dredging projects at its various ports. For over three decades NQBP has been undertaking dredging programs to ensure the safe navigation of ships and port efficiency. This highly regulated process has been undertaken without significant impacts with the material dredged returned safely to the marine environment.
  • Dredged material relocation at sea is highly regulated and requires extensive analysis of alternatives in accordance with international protocols (London Convention) and Commonwealth requirement (Sea Dumping Act). Decisions with regards to dredging are based on achieving the best environmental outcome.
  • Material for ocean disposal is tested under rigorous requirements set out by the National Australian Guidelines for Dredging (NADG) in accordance with London Protocol, an international agreement relating to the disposal of dredged material in Australian waters. Only material that has been tested and determined suitable for ocean disposal is disposed of at sea.
  • Toxic or hazardous material cannot be disposed of at sea.
  • In 2006, NQBP dredged around nine million m3 of material in the Port of Hay Point and relocated it to an offshore relocation area in the GBR Marine Park. There were no significant or long term environmental impacts from the dredging apart from increased water turbidity during the dredging. No impacts on fishery values were reported.
  • Acid Sulphate Soils (ASS) requires oxygen in the air to catalyse chemical reactions that result in the formation of acids. These reactions do not occur while the material is saturated in water therefore the chemical reaction resulting in ASS cannot occur during offshore disposal.
  • Onshore and offshore options for the disposal of dredged material are considered and studied. The recommendation is based on the best environmental outcome which allows a proposed project to be viable.
  • Since 2002, 22 dredging campaigns (maintenance and capital) have been undertaken at NQBP ports without incident.
  • Current proposed dredging for Abbot Point will be 3 million cubic metres in total and will be undertaken in two to three separate campaigns over five years lasting up to four weeks each.